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Entries in Apple iPhone (2)

Tuesday
Nov162010

A Law Suit Waiting to Happen

A really cheesy catalog arrived at our house yesterday full of kitsch and other junk. This is just one of the choice items available: a "Touch-Screen MP4 Player & Camera."

The Settings, Clock, and Camera icons look like they came right from the iPhone. Notice the volume indicator in the upper left, made to look like a cellular signal indicator. And let's not even bother pointing out the shape of the device.

All this can be yours for the low, low price of $59.95, right in the U. S. of A.

Click to Enlarge

 

Tuesday
Feb022010

Adobe is Running Scared from Evolving Standards

Buy this from SpreadshirtLike the iPhone and iPod Touch that came before it, the iPad runs the same slimmed-down version of Mac OS X complete with it's multi-touch controls, icons and menu bar.

The iPad also shares with its forebears a lack of support for Adobe's Flash. Flash is an application runtime environment (a nerdy way of saying "software that lets other software work") that competes with the native applications on the iPhone, so it would make business sense that Apple might exclude it from the native capabilities of the "iPlatform".

More likely however, is the fact that Flash is buggy, crashes often and can suck up CPU cycles like crazy.

Case in point: now that I'm running Google Chrome on my MacBook, I can see how often Flash crashes as the browser will remain functioning but indicate that the plug-in has crashed. These are crashes I used to blame on my browser - Safari, Firefox, Opera, Camino - all of them. Shame on me.

Given how maniacal Apple is about the user experience and stability of the iPlatform, it's a no-brainer for them to exclude Flash - competitive issues aside.

And now, with the triumvirate of the iPhone, iPod Touch and soon iPad, Adobe is getting a little uncomfortable. If there's one company that can utilize its momentum and marketing prowess to shift an industry from de facto standards to web standards, it's Apple - and in this case, that web standard is HTML5.

Apple did this for the Webkit rendering engine that now powers Safari and Mobile Safari, but also Google Chrome, Android and soon a variety of other Webkit-based browsers for mobile devices like BlackBerry. They did it for video with H.264 and soon, they'll do it for HTML5.

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